Why uncertainty is not necessarily such a bad thing

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Why uncertainty is not necessarily such a bad thing


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murori

Summary

  • The Covid-19 pandemic that caught the world completely unaware and unprepared for disasters of that nature has taught us a lesson.
  • Crumbling of highly stable business, loss of jobs by people who thought they had permanent jobs and shrinking of profit margins serve as an eye-opening experience that reminds us to always plan for uncertainty.

If there is one thing that has baffled me in the last one year is the people’s perception of Covid-19 pandemic.

The medics, politicians, religious and lay people had their own perception about the disease and its various facets. We recall with trepidation the first days when those who died of Covid-19 used to be buried hurriedly and dishonourably by officers in full protective gear.

We had all sorts of people prescribing all manner of solutions — herbs, prayers, antimalarial drugs — and others denying its existence altogether.

However, with time many things have changed; the dead are getting decent burial and we know more about the disease than we did a year ago. Our perspective of the disease has changed.

Perception may be defined as the ability to see, hear, or become aware of something through the senses.

This reminds me of the fable of four blind men who were asked to feel an elephant and describe what it was.

The first man felt the elephant’s leg and said the creature was like a tree. The second blind man touched the elephant’s enormous side and said that it was like a wall. The third man touched the tail and declared that the elephant was like a thick rope. The fourth felt the tusk and likened it to a spear.

Each man’s notion of reality was limited by the kind of attribute he had been able to perceive. This gives credence to the saying that little knowledge is very dangerous.

Each of the four had own perception and conclusion. None of them had enough information to arrive at the reality as we know it.

The many changes that have happened in the last few years mainly brought by technological changes, terrorism, diseases and climate change have left us more uncertain about future than ever before.

Most of us have had to put dreams on hold, change goals, and reevaluate our priorities. This has been informed largely on our perception rather than the reality. Each one us has a perspective about nearly everything in life.

The question is whether our perspective of our economy, business, state of jobs and so on, is a representation of reality.

Most likely it is not. This is because it depends on what part we felt.

As we face this reality two things are very important to know. First, our perception is limited by our environment, what we experience with our senses. Therefore, the more interactions we make, the more we see and feel the nearer we get to the reality.

Secondly, uncertainty is not necessarily a bad thing. Like every cloud has a silver lining and every adversity carries a seed of opportunity, there are positive things too about uncertainty.

The Covid-19 pandemic that caught the world completely unaware and unprepared for disasters of that nature has taught us a lesson.

Crumbling of highly stable business, loss of jobs by people who thought they had permanent jobs and shrinking of profit margins serve as an eye-opening experience that reminds us to always plan for uncertainty no matter how certain things might seem.

Mr Kiunga is a business trainer and the author of ‘The Art of Entrepreneurship: Strategies to Succeed in a Competitive Market’

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